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Read the latest thoughts on maintenance reliability and asset management from Author and Expert Terry Wireman
Now that ISO-55000 has been published, many individuals and organizations are questioning if they should adopt it. Here is one more reason for companies to investigate ISO-55000 and see if it has application in their business. It is Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular No. A-119 (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars_a119) . What is the purpose of this document? It clearly states in section 1 that “this Circular directs agencies to use voluntary consensus standards in lieu of government-unique standards”. ISO-55000 is considered a voluntary consensus standard. Some other points in the circular that I found interesting: 1. Section 6 – “All federal...
Regulatory Agencies, Insurance Companies, and Lawyers. Almost everyone is familiar with the way the Jeopardy game is played. The answer to a question is given and it is up to the contestants to figure out the real question. While this may seem easy, it often is quite difficult. For example, consider the three entities listed at the start of this blog. What do regulatory agencies (OSHA, EPA, FDA, etc.), insurance companies, and lawyers have in common? On the surface, one might say not much. However, that is about to change. Sometime about January 15th, 2014 the ISO-5500X series of standards...
Recently I was engaging in some mindless entertainment watching “Dances with the Stars” on the television. An interesting event took place, a favorite dancer of the judges was voted off. The dancer that stayed (Bill Engvall) was less skilled, but hugely entertaining, and clearly a fan favorite. The judges and those who appreciate skilled dancing were outraged – the rest of us were entertained. Now why mention this in a “Maintenance/ Reliability” blog? Because there is an interesting lesson here. On the dance show, the contestants are given two scores – one by the judges for their actual dance. The...
I am just getting ready to conduct the Benchmarking workshop for the SMRP conference Indianapolis on 10/14. As I am reviewing the workshop content, I ran across an interesting point in the “Best Practices Benchmarking” textbook written by Sylvia Codling. In setting the stage for the rest of the book’s content, on page 10, she makes this point –“The advantage of benchmarking, which looks at processes rather than outputs, is that many diverse businesses share a certain number of processes”. So reflecting on that point for a moment, how often do we find benchmarking effort that focus solely on numbers?...
In my last blog, I referenced a recent Harvard Business Review Blog, (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/06/what_inspiring_leaders_do.html?goback=%2Egde_1886721_member_254905125). While discussing being inspirational as applied to maintenance and reliability managers, one might question whether they must “have” or can develop inspirational skills? The article indicated that being inspirational can be a developed leadership skill. For example, the article pointed out that the 310 leaders who set out to improve their ability to inspire, the group raised their overall test scores from the 42% level (below average) to the 70% level. This provides evidence that being inspirational is a leadership skill that can be developed. The article...
In a recent Harvard Business Review Blog, (http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/06/what_inspiring_leaders_do.html?goback=%2Egde_1886721_member_254905125) leadership traits were examined in an attempt to find out what made some leaders more effective than others. Many common traits were typically found in good leaders, such as: They set stretch goals with their team They spent time developing their subordinates They engaged in highly collaborative behavior They encouraged those about them to be more innovative I had to stop at that point in the blog and wonder how many maintenance and reliability managers display just these four traits? For example, how often do maintenance and reliability managers share departmental goals...